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Your Legal Rights is a collection of legal information resources produced by hundreds of organizations across Ontario.

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Legal Topic: Rights of offenders

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What Happens if My Friend Shoplifts?

This post on the Justice for Children and Youth blog looks at what happens when a young person is caught shoplifting as well as the possible legal consequences for her friend who didn’t report it or try to stop her. The article includes information on Civil Recovery letters as well as what these young people could be charged with under the Criminal Code.

Available in:

English

Format:

Web

Produced/Updated In:

2013

Record Suspension Application Guide and Forms

Note: As of March 13, 2012, the term “pardon” has been replaced with “record suspension” in Canada. This page on the Parole Board of Canada’s website has links for downloading the Record Suspension Application Guide and Forms, which reflects new eligibility criteria as a result of legislative changes introduced in March 2012.

Available in:

English, Français

Produced by:

Parole Board of Canada

Format:

Web

Produced/Updated In:

2012

Civil Recovery Demand Letters for Shoplifting

This video explains what your rights and obligations are if you receive a Civil Recovery Demand Letter or you are being asked to pay money to a store as a result of a shoplifting incident.

Available in:

English

Format:

Video

Produced/Updated In:

2011

LawFacts.ca

LawFacts is a website designed by Legal Aid Ontario (LAO) that provides free legal information about criminal, family, and refugee law, and court-related mental health issues. Resources for Aboriginal Canadians and help with finding a lawyer are also available.

Available in:

English, Français

Format:

Web

Produced/Updated In:

2011

The Prison Disciplinary Process: Your Legal Rights

This booklet explains your rights if you are charged with a disciplinary offence in federal prison. It looks at what a disciplinary offence is, how the hearing process unfolds, penalties, and reviewing a disciplinary decision. Although this publication was written for prisoners in British Columbia, the information in it deals with federal law and therefore applies throughout Canada.

Available in:

English

Format:

Booklet/PDF

Produced/Updated In:

2011

Types of Release

This fact sheet outlines the types of conditional releases that may be granted to offenders before the end of their prison sentences. It describes temporary absence, day parole, full parole, and statutory release, and gives the eligibility criteria for each.

Available in:

English, Français

Produced by:

Parole Board of Canada

Format:

Booklet/PDF

Produced/Updated In:

2010

Are you Aboriginal? Do you have a bail hearing? Or are you going to be sentenced for a crime?

This booklet and accompanying poster are about the right of Aboriginal peoples, as a result of a case called Gladue, to have a judge take their background into account when setting bail or deciding on a sentence. The booklet explains the kind of information a judge needs in order to apply Gladue, when to give the judge this information, and where to go for help.

Format:

Booklet/PDF

Produced/Updated In:

2009

Are you Aboriginal? Do you have a bail hearing? Or are you going to be sentenced for a crime? (poster)

This poster, like the booklet with the same title, is about the right of Aboriginal peoples, as a result of a case called Gladue, to have a judge take their background into account when setting bail or deciding on a sentence. It includes a list of places to go for further help and information.

Format:

Poster

Produced/Updated In:

2009

Fact Sheet: Common Criminal Legal Terms

This fact sheet contains plain-language definitions of terms commonly used in criminal law. It explains terms such as absolute discharge, beyond a reasonable doubt, conditional discharge, duty counsel, examination in chief, hybrid offense, indictable offence, summary offence, and surety.

Available in:

English

Produced by:

Springtide Resources

Format:

Web

Produced/Updated In:

2008

In Brief: Restorative Justice in the Criminal Context

Designed for grade 10 to 12 students and their teachers, this resource explains the basic principles of restorative justice, which include the goals of restoring the losses suffered by victims of crime and reintegrating wrongdoers into the community.

Format:

Web

Produced/Updated In:

2008