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Your Legal Rights is a collection of legal information resources produced by  organizations across Ontario.

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Legal Topic: Health and Disability

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Requesting Medical Information

This article, which appears in the Spring 2012 DCLC Newsletter, looks at what kind of medical information an employer may ask for from an employee who is requesting workplace accommodation for a disability or medical condition.

Available in:

English

Format:

Booklet/PDF, Newsletter

Produced/Updated In:

2012

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Teen Pregnancy – Part One: Medical Decisions

Part One of a two-part Justice for Children and Youth blogpost on teen pregnancy discusses when a young person can make decisions about their own medical treatment, such as how to deal with teen pregnancy; who decides if they are capable of making those decisions; and what happens if they are deemed not capable.

Available in:

English

Format:

Web

Produced/Updated In:

2012

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Tips and Traps When Dealing with Long-Term Care

This is a list of tips and traps to be aware of when considering long-term care placement or alternatives. It appears on pages 12 and 13 of the Advocacy Centre for the Elderly (ACE) Spring/Summer 2012 newsletter.

Available in:

English

Format:

Booklet/PDF

Produced/Updated In:

2012

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Disability and human rights

The Code protects people from discrimination and harassment because of past, present and perceived disabilities.  “Disability” covers a broad range and degree of conditions, some visible and some not visible.

Available in:

English, Français

Format:

Video

Produced/Updated In:

2011

Epilepsy & The Law

This booklet is meant to address the potential legal issues, statutes, and policies that currently affect people living with epilepsy. 

Available in:

English

Produced by:

Epilepsy Ontario

Format:

Booklet/PDF

Produced/Updated In:

2011

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A Brand New World: Ontario’s New Long-Term Care Homes Act

This insert in the Summer 2010 Advocacy Centre for the Elderly newsletter is a brief guide to the the Long-Term Care Homes Act, in effect July 1, 2010. It includes such topics as residents' rights, care, and services, altercations, complaints, minimizing restraints, Resident and Family Adviser, and Residents' and Family Councils.

Available in:

English

Format:

Booklet/PDF

Produced/Updated In:

2010

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Home Care

Written for seniors, this section of the Advocacy Centre for the Elderly (ACE) web site describes home care services in Ontario and how they are provided. There are also Frequently Asked Questions, links to ACE publications on topics such as complaints and appeals, and links to information from other organizations.

Available in:

English

Format:

Web

Produced/Updated In:

2010

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Hospitals

Written for seniors, this section of the Advocacy Centre for the Elderly (ACE) web site describes what kinds of hospitals there are in Ontario and whom they serve. There are also Frequently Asked Questions, links to ACE publications on issues such as transfers from hospitals to long-term care, and links to information from other organizations.

Available in:

English

Format:

Web

Produced/Updated In:

2010

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Long-Term Care Homes

Written for seniors, this section of the Advocacy Centre for the Elderly (ACE) web site explains how a person chooses a long-term care home and who pays for the accommodation. There are also Frequently Asked Questions, links to ACE publications on topics such as evaluations of capacity and first available bed policies, and links to information...

Available in:

English

Format:

Web

Produced/Updated In:

2010

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Patients’ Rights: Form 1 – Are you in hospital for a psychiatric assessment?

By signing a Form 1, a doctor can keep someone in a psychiatric hospital for up to 72 hours for an assessment. This booklet explains what can happen after the assessment, what the person can do if they want to get out of the hospital, and who makes decisions about treatment.

Available in:

English, Français

Format:

Booklet/PDF

Produced/Updated In:

2009